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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Engine Oils

What's the difference b/n mineral, semi-synth, full synth and premium full synth oil?

Each of these oils are made with different base oils. MINERAL oils are made with highly refined Group 1 or pure hydrocracked Group 2 Base oil. SEMI SYNTHETIC oils are made with a minimum of 20% Synthetic Base Oils. FULL SYNTHETIC oils are made from high quality synthetic Base Oils. PREMIUM FULL SYNTHETIC oils are made from high quality synthetic base oils including man made PAO and/or Esters.


Can you mix the older, semi-synthetic HPR oils with the new, full synthetic HPR oils?

Yes. HPR 0 semi-synthetic and HPR 0 full synthetic can be mixed. The same goes for HPR 5, 10 and 15.


Why is my oil consumption so high?

High oil consumption could have a number of causes. The most common tend to be: using too low a viscosity for the application, viscosity breakdown, using a low quality oil grade, damaged rings or seals or simply normal engine wear over extended periods.


Does the colour of the oil mean anything?

Sometimes a dye is added for product identification (e.g. DEXRON-III and DEXRON-VI will always be red as it is part of GM's requirements). Base oils and additives have natural variations in colours (i.e. browns to pale golds) but have no bearing on the performance of the oil. Used oil is usually darker than fresh oil due to various causes (e.g. soot, age, oxidation, contamination, etc.).


Why should I use OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) approved engine oils?

Some vehicle manufacturers have strict guidelines in relation to what approval specification the engine oil used in their vehicles must have. Lubricant manufacturers can supply approved products in order to maintain vehicle manufacturers’ warranties. Failure to use an OEM approved oil can therefore in some cases, void the manufacturer’s warranty.
Penrite holds many OEM approvals from major global automotive manufacturers, and these are being added too regularly. These OEM approvals are issued to Penrite to ensure that products, blended by Penrite, have met or exceeded their requirements as a warranty approved product. Not using an OEM approved product, during the vehicles warranty period can be a risk! Even after the warranty period has expired using Penrite Engine Oils will help to maintain engine performance over the life of the vehicle.
Copies of the OEM Approvals can be found under the Products Tab on the Penrite Web Site. Click here to learn more.


What is zinc or ZDDP?

Zinc Dialkyl DithioPhosphate, also referred to as ZDDP or the "zinc" in an oil, is a chemical compound which is a very effective anti-wear agent. For this reason, when zinc levels were lowered in oils to meet the latest specifications in some new vehicles, it caused some concern, as older vehicles manufactured pre-2006 needed the high levels of zinc (especially preferred and required by pre-1970s vehicle owners). For futher details on ZDDP and levels of zinc in Penrite engine oils, please refer to Technical Bulletins 137, 169, 192 and 195.


My vehicle manual recommends a 10W-30 oil. Can I use a 10W-40 oil instead?

Yes. At Penrite, we believe that having a higher viscosity at hot (second number in SAExW-y) will be of benefit to your engine, particularly under tough Australian climate conditions. Penrite's viscosities often have the "Extra 10"; this is because a slighty higher viscosity = slightly thicker oil film between the engine components. Hence, better protection for the engine, as there will be less metal on metal contact.


What is a DPF or CPF?

DPF stands for Diesel Particulate Filter (sometimes called CPF - Catalysed Particulate Filter). These are filters in the exhaust line of many post-2006 diesel vehicles which trap tiny particles in the exhaust gases resulting in cleaner exhaust emissions. Most vehicles with a DPF need a low SAPS oil to prevent premature blockage of the DPF. Replacement/manual regeneration of the prematurely blocked DPF has been known to be a very costly enterprise, so the correct engine oil must be used at all times.
To learn more about DPF's Click here


Can petrol engine oils be used in diesel engines?

Petrol engine oils can only be used in diesel engines if the oil meets the minimum requirements specified by the Handbook. For example, if the Handbook requires API CE or CF then as long as the oil meets API CF or higher specifications then there is no issue. It will be better though for the engine if diesel oil is used. Note: If the Handbook requires an API CJ-4, an oil meeting API CI-4 will not be suitable.


Can you mix mineral based oil with synthetic based oil?

Mineral, Semi Synthetic and Synthetic oils can be mixed together, although this is not recommended. During the blending process, various additive packs are added to base oil to achieve various oil specifications for different intended uses. Therefore, these oils may not always be compatible with one another. In certain circumstances, putting the wrong oil into an engine can cause extensive damage to the engine or components associated with it. It’s always best to use the same brand, type, viscosity and manufacturer specification when either topping up or replacing your engine oil.


Is it true that if you use synthetic oils, you can not go back to using mineral oils?

No it isn’t. It may take a couple of oil changes for the engine to settle down with the new engine oil (which is sometimes the case going from brand-to-brand or grade-to-grade), but after that, there shouldn’t be any problems.


Why is changing engine oils on a regular basis important?

Over time, the oil will deteriorate and become less efficient at providing good lubrication.
Two main reasons are:
 1. To remove contaminants that degrade the oil.
Moisture (condensation)
Un-burnt fuel (ie fuel dilution)
Soot (by product of combustion, especially in diesels)
Oxidation and Nitration By-products
2. To refresh the oil
Additives in the oil deteriorate over time.
Detergents, that help keep the engine clean become less effective
Dispersants, that hold contaminants in the oil become saturated and can no longer retain contaminants.
Even the anti-wear additives need to be replaced.


How often should I change my engine oil?

Most vehicle manufacturers have a recommended service period either based on kilometres travelled or a specified time period. To maintain the vehicles engine in good condition, owners should not exceed these specified service periods. The use of high quality engine oil will provide protection for the engine throughout the whole service period. We do not recommend exceeding the manufacturer’s service intervals. Your owners hand book will contain the vehicles recommended servicing periods. These can vary by manufacturer, engine type and conditions in which the vehicle is used.
To ensure you select the correct grade and specification of oil for your vehicle, look up your vehicle on the Penrite Recommendation Guide Click here to look up your vehicle.


What is the difference between multigrade and monograde oils?

Multigrade oils must meet both a “W” low temperature (Cold Cranking) viscosity requirement and a 100°C “operating temperature” requirement. A multigrade oil gives you the best of both worlds by maintaining its performance at high and low temperatures. All liquids thin out as heat increases but a multigrade keeps viscosity at optimum levels within a certain temperature range. Monograde oils do not have a low temperature requirement. Therefore, as the temperature decreases, they thicken considerably faster than equivalent multigrade oils, hence they are less efficient (e.g. SAE 30 and SAE 10W-30). This is what the viscosities on the label denote (e.g. 10W-50).


What oil should i use in my vehicle?

To find out what oil to use in your vehicle, you will need to know the following –
Make of Vehicle
Year of Manufacture
Model Type
Engine Type
Transmission Type
Most of these are all available from your owner’s handbook.
To ensure you select the correct grade and specification of oil for your vehicle, look up your vehicle on the Penrite Recommendation Guide Click here to look up your vehicle.
Select your vehicle type
Select your make
Select your model
The Penrite recommendation guide will not only advise you of the correct oil, but will also recommend all of your lubricant needs for your vehicle based on the vehicle manufacturer’s specifications.
Some vehicles require an OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) approved oil. Failure to use the correct oil can result in the vehicle’s warranty being void.
We always recommend using our recomendation guide either in store or on the web.


What oil should I use in my LPG fuelled vehicle?

If your vehicle is powered by LPG (Liquid Petroleum Gas) or is dual fuel (Petrol/LPG), Penrite has a range of products suitable for your vehicle. Running a vehicle on LPG can bring a significant cost saving over running a vehicle on petrol, but ensuring you utilise the correct oil is imperative.
The main reason why you need to use a specialised gas oil is due to oil nitration. Oil nitration is the main cause of bearing wear in LPG powered vehicles. This can happen particularly when the oil is run past its drain period, by using poor quality oil, by using poor quality fuels or utilising the incorrect oil specification. In these cases the oil can become nitrated by the gas and begin to cause bearing failure.
Ordinary petrol oils do not cater for these effects, therefore using specialised LPG oil can save on expensive repair bills.
Penrite HPR Gas and HPR Gas 10 have effective additives that counter balance the effects of running your vehicle on LPG.
For further information on the range of Penrite Gas Oils Click here
If your LPG was factory fitted by the vehicle manufacturer then visit our Recommendation Guide to search for the right oil for your vehicle. Click here to visit the Penrite Recommendation Guide.
If your LPG was fitted “after market”, then call our Technical Support dept on
1300 PENRITE (1300 736 748) so as we can advise you on the correct oil for your vehicle.


Does Penrite oil clean my engine?

All Penrite oils contain additives that improve the performance of the engine oil. These additives, amongst other important ingredients, contain detergents and dispersants. Detergents are incorporated into the engine oil to keep the internals of your engine clean, whilst dispersants are added to suspend the contaminants and these are then flushed away during an oil change. Modern day engine oils require carefully selected additives to perform these tasks and not become saturated during the extended oil drain interval. Penrite oils are developed to keep cleaning and looking after your engine for the entire service period. To keep your engine clean, you should change your oil and oil filter regularly.


What is low SAPS engine oil?

“SAPS” stands for “Sulphated Ash, Phosphorous and Sulphur”.
A low “SAPS” engine oil has a lesser amount of these elements than a standard engine oil. The levels vary depending on the type of oil needed. Low “SAPS” oils are generally used in modern turbo diesel engines that are fitted a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) or in modern petrol engines to assist in fuel economy gains.


Does Penrite produce oils suitable for vehicles fitted with a DPF?

Penrite does produce oils suitable for vehicles fitted with a DPF (Diesel Particulate Filter).
Modern turbo diesel vehicles are increasingly being fitted with DPF’s to assist in reducing engine emissions and they require specific oil compatible with these units. The Penrite Enviro Plus range of engine oils cover the majority of diesel passenger cars available in the market today that are fitted with a DPF.
The Penrite Enviro Plus range of engine oils also hold OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturers) approvals so these oils can be used in your new vehicles without effecting your manufacturer’s warranty.
To learn more about the Enviro Plus range Click here
Penrite also produces oils for heavy diesel vehicles that are fitted with a DPF. To learn more about the Diesel HD range Click here
To ensure you use the correct oil for your vehicle, visit the Penrite Recommendation Guide.
Click here to visit the Penrite Recommendation Guide.
To learn more about DPF's Click here


Why the name Enviro+ for an engine Oil?

At Penrite we are working towards a cleaner future and protecting the environment from unnecessary pollutants as part of our vision. Modern vehicle manufacturers are also introducing technology into their products that can lower the effects of environmental damage caused by pollutants produced by modern day transport. Some of the manufacturer introduced technology such as diesel particulate filters necessitated the need for fuels and lubricants to be both cleaner and carry less of the ingredients that were harmful to the environment.
Penrite has introduced a new range of engine oils to not only cater for these vehicles that require these cleaner running oils but to also introduce newer and cleaner technologies into our engine oils that will allow them to become less harmful to the environment but also provide our customers with the ultimate protection for which we are renowned.
Hence why we called our cleaner running oils “Enviro +”. Not only do they care for the environment, but also for your engine!
To ensure you use the correct oil for your vehicle, visit the Penrite Recommendation Guide.
Click here to visit the Penrite Recommendation Guide.
To learn more about Enviro+ Engine Oil Click here


What does Shear Free mean in 10 Tenths Range?

The Penrite10/Tenths Racing oils range uses a unique Sheer Free formulation. This ensures that the oil will hold its viscosity for the life of the oil even under the most arduous of treatment on the road or on the racetrack. Most engine oils contain viscosity index (V.I.) improvers to slow down the oil thinning process. Oil thinning is caused through heat in an internal combustion engine. Viscosity index improvers expand as they heat allowing the oil to become multi-grade instead of mono grade. These V.I. improvers are sheared by the engines internal movements causing the oil to lose some of its effective viscosity lowering its performance to protect the engine. Penrites range of 10/Tenths Racing oils do not contain viscosity index improvers as normally found in most multi-grade engine oils so therefore cannot be sheared and therefore will provide better protection for the life of the oil.
No other oil on the market has this unique feature!

To view the 10/Tenths Racing range Click Here.


What is the purpose of engine oil?

Everyone will tell you motor oil is an engine’s best friend and here’s why. Your motor oil’s main job is to stop wear and friction in your engine. This is caused when the various metal engine parts grind together and heat up. As motor oil flows around your engine it lubricates the metal surfaces, reducing friction and dispersing heat. Motor oil also helps to keep your engine clean and free from build-ups by holding all the by products of combustion (like silica and acids) in suspension. And for the hat trick, motor oil reduces rust and corrosion by limiting your engine’s exposure to oxygen.


How do i change my engine oil ?

Oil change

Changing your oil is one of the most important things you’ll ever do for your engine. Going DIY not only saves dollars, it’s also very satisfying if you enjoy getting a little grease under your fingernails. And it’s actually a lot easier than you think with our safe step-by-step guide.

 

What’s the big deal about changing my oil?

Like anything, motor oil has a limited shelf life and starts to break down after a period of use, making it less efficient in lubricating and cooling engine parts.

There are two key reasons for this. Firstly, the additives that protect your engine against corrosion, oxidisation and engine wear get used up as they do their job. And secondly, contaminants like soot, carbon and acids build up and start to affect the critical properties of your oil, such as viscosity.

 

How often should I change my oil?

Oil that’s not changed regularly can do serious damage to your engine and compromise the safety of your vehicle. This is why manufacturers recommend that you change your oil regularly – either after a specified period of time or after a certain distance. Most owner manuals have two recommendations for oil changes – standard and severe – which are based on the kind of conditions you drive in.

 

Your step-by-step guide to changing oil

The first thing to do is get together everything you need to get the job done safely and well. Here’s a checklist:

Approximately 5 litres of Penrite motor oil
Check your owner's manual for correct SAE viscosity, API or ACEA performance and quantity.

A drop sheet

A new oil filter
Again your owner's manual will tell you the type and size you need.

A drain plug socket wrench or open-end wrench (exact size) and an oil filter wrench.

A large drain pan, at least double the size of your sump.

A rag, hand cleaning solution and/or disposable latex gloves.

A funnel

 

Step 1 - Choose Your Oil

Your owner's manual will give you information on what kind of oil you need for both normal and severe driving conditions. It might surprise you to know that a lot of driving actually falls into the severe category. Extreme temperatures, frequent short trips, stop-start traffic and hauling or towing all put extra strain on your engine and mean you need an oil that is suitable for severe driving conditions, as well as more regular oil changes.

A good guide is to change your motor oil and oil filter every 5,000 kilometres or every six months, whichever comes first. Doing this will give better engine protection and prolong your engine’s life. Make sure you check your owner's manual for special conditions and do not exceed warranty recommendations.

Need some expert advice? Call Penrite’s Technical Services Helpline during business hours on 1800 110 080.

 

Step 2 - Prepare safely

Always put your safety first. Before you even think about getting under your vehicle, read the safety information in your manual. Choose level ground and start by laying a drop sheet to avoid permanent staining.

Unless you want to risk looking like road kill, never use a jack to support your vehicle. Wheel ramps are much more stable and will tilt the car just enough to allow you to slide underneath.
Drive your vehicle onto the wheel ramps so that the front tyres are raised, apply the emergency brake and chock the rear wheels to prevent rolling.

Put your vehicle in first gear if you have a manual transmission or park if you have an automatic transmission and you’re good to go.

 

Step 3 - Drain the old oil

Warm oil drains much more quickly, so run your engine for about 5 to10 minutes to bring it to normal operating temperature. Then turn off the engine and wait till it’s cool. Open the hood and loosen the oil sump cap to allow the oil to drain from the bottom more freely.
Find the oil drain plug and put the drain pan underneath it. Using a wrench, turn the plug anti-clockwise until it rotates freely. Remove the plug CAREFULLY to avoid burning yourself as the oil may still be very hot.

 

Step 4 - Remove the Oil Filter

Next, loosen the oil filter by turning it anti-clockwise using a filter wrench. Carefully ease it away from the engine and tip the contents into the drain pan.

 

Step 5 - Replace the oil filter

Using a rag, wipe in and around the filter seal on the engine. Take a new filter and apply a light film of oil (new or used) to the circular edge of the filter itself (aka the gasket).

Fill the new filter with new engine oil and screw it onto the threaded oil line in a clockwise direction. Tighten the filter by hand.

Clean the oil plug and drain set and if necessary replace the plug basket or seal. Screw the plug in by hand and finish by tightening it with a wrench, but don’t overtighten.

 

Step 6 - Add clean oil

Unscrew the cap on top of your engine (the one that says “Oil”!) and fill her up with the recommended amount of oil, checking the level with the dipstick. Replace the cap and wipe off excess oil.

Now it’s time to test your handiwork. The oil light should go out as soon as the engine is switched on.


Exactly what’s in engine oil ?

In a nutshell, motor oils are made up of two ingredients: base stocks (conventional or synthetic) and additives.

Base Stocks - Conventional base stocks are made from naturally occurring crude oil pumped from the earth and processed in an oil refinery.

Not surprisingly, synthetic base stocks are developed in a lab. They are produced from relatively pure chemicals and are engineered with specific characteristics in mind e.g. better performance in extreme temperatures.

Additives - Additives are what you might call the active ingredients your motor oil. Combined with base stocks they provide all sorts of functions, from cleaning and cooling your engine to preventing rust and protecting against extreme pressure.

A bit like the nutrients in soil, these additives need to be replenished regularly – which is one of the reasons why oil changes are so important for your engine.


What does motor oil do for my engine?

Everyone will tell you motor oil is an engine’s best friend and here’s why. Your motor oil’s main job is to stop wear and friction in your engine. This is caused when the various metal engine parts grind together and heat up As motor oil flows around your engine it lubricates the metal surfaces, reducing friction and dispersing heat. Motor oil also helps to keep your engine clean and free from build-ups by holding all the by products of combustion (like silica and acids) in suspension. And for the hat trick, motor oil reduces rust and corrosion by limiting your engine’s exposure to oxygen.


What does API & ACEA stand for?

API - American Petroleum Instititute

ACEA - Association des Constructuers Europeans de l’Automobile

To learn more about API & ACEA, please see our technical bulletin on API Classifications - Click Here to see API classifications.


Why should I use Penrite oil?

Penrite has been manufacturing lubricants for nearly 90 years. Apart from the experience, Penrite only use the very best products to blend our lubricants. Using the best ingredients provides our customers with products that are unsurpassed in quality and 100% guaranteed to perform their intended function. We also use the very latest technology to ensure our products meet and exceed the stringent requirements of vehicle manufacturers. Penrite is one of the only lubricant companies that provides OEM approvals with their products. These approvals come from the manufacturers and are a quality assurance that our products are made to perform correctly in their intended applications.

Penrite is an Australian owned family business. We blend our oils right here in Australia for Australian conditions. Penrite oils are designed to cope with Australia's harsh climatic conditions and provide the ultimate in protection for your vehicle.

Many Penrite oils feature our "Extra 10" in he oils viscosity range that provides an extra layer of protection over standard SAE grade rated oils. This is just another way Penrite look after our customers and hence why we have been around for nearly 90 years.


What is the difference between Penrite Engine Oil brands?

HPR Premium range of Full Synthetic, Semi Synthetic & Premium Mineral based engine oils. They feature the latest API & ACEA specifications as well as a Double Layer of engine wear protection with FULL ZINC & Penrite's famous EXTRA TEN technology.

10 TENTHS High performance Full Synthetic 100% PAO (Group 4) & ESTER (Group 5) base oils. The RACING range have SHEAR FREE formulations that maintain oil pressure and eliminate viscosity loss. PREMIUM oils feature Penrite's advanced EXTRA TEN technology. Both RACING and PREMIUM ranges have FULL ZINC + anti wear additive packages. The 10 TENTHS range is competition proven and trusted protection for performance engines.

ENVIRO+ Application specific and are full synthetic low and mid SAPS engine oils. They feature the latest API & ACEA specifications for better wear protection, less sludge and lower piston deposits and are suitable for vehicles fitted with diesel catalysts and DPF (Diesel Particulate Filters). They have OEM Approvals to maintain vehicle warranty.

EVERYDAY Semi Synthetic & Premium Mineral engine oils designed for normal everyday motoring. They feature the latest API & ACEA specifications and are available in a viscosity to suit most vehicles.

CLASSIC Premium oils specifically designed for Classic, Veteran & Vintage vehicles made prior to 1980. They are designed to meet and exceed the original technical specifications and requirements of these vehicles using the latest oil technology to preserve these historic machines.


Additives in motor oil

Additives are what you might call the active ingredients your motor oil. Combined with base stocks they provide all sorts of functions, from cleaning and cooling your engine to preventing rust and protecting against extreme pressure.

A bit like the nutrients in soil, these additives need to be replenished regularly – which is one of the reasons why oil changes are so important for your engine.


Synthetic or Mineral motor oil?

All lubes fall into one of three categories: liquid (oil), semi-liquid (grease) and solid (graphite). And all lubes (mineral and synthetic) contain chemical additives which enhance their ability to cool and protect your engine.


The difference between mineral & synthetic oils?

The key difference between mineral & synthetic oil is that synthetics are created from purer chemicals and combined with a greater number of more technically sophisticated additives. This means that synthetics can be engineered to perform more effectively than mineraloils in certain conditions.


Why choose synthetics?

A major performance advantage of synthetics is their ability to provide optimum lube at extreme temperatures. They remain stable at very high temperatures (when most conventional oils start to break down) and remain fluid at very low temperatures (when conventional oils start to thicken). This reduces wear and tear and helps to maintain a cleaner, more efficient engine.

Synthetics also last longer because they break down more slowly than conventional oils – but remember, just like conventional oils, regular oil changes are essential to remove contaminants.

If you can capitalise on the benefits – for example if you drive in extreme conditions or have a high performance car – synthetics can be the way to go. Although they’re more expensive, they can work out better value in the longer term. You might also consider a blend – a more cost-effective mix of synthetic and conventional oils.

The bottom line is that each car is different and you need to consider a range of factors including manufacturer’s recommendations, climate conditions and, last but not least, affordability. That’s why we recommend using our Oil Selector to find the perfect oil fit for your car.


Engine Coolants

What is the difference between Type A and Type B Coolants?

Type A Coolants contain inhibitors to protect the cooling system from rust, corrosion & cavitation as well as an effective Anti-Freeze/Anti Boil solution normally present as a type of glycol.
Type B coolants contain only inhibitors for rust, corrosion & cavitation. They DO NOT contain any Anti-Freeze/Anti-Boil emulsions.
Therefore Type A coolants will keep your cooling system from rusting and deteriorating as well as providing a lower freezing and a higher boiling temperature.
Type B coolants will keep your cooling system from rusting and deteriorating. If the Type B contains an effective water wetting agent, then this can assist the cooling system to operate more effectively.
Click Here to learn more about our range of Engine Coolants.
Click Here to visit the Penrite Coolants Website.


What is the difference between Red & Green coolant?

All colours in coolants are dyes used by the manufacturers to distinguish different products. In Australia, Red/Pink/Magenta coloured coolants are generally contain an OAT inhibitor pack and Green/Blue/Yellow generally contain Hybrid inhibitor packs. Overall, a coolant can be any colour that a manufacturer wants to make it. Too learn more about coolants, please visit our Technical Bulletin on coolants - Click Here to go to Coolant Technical Bulletin


Brake Fluid

What does DOT stand for when referring to brake fluid?

Similar to API, ACEA and JASO classifications for lubricants, DOT (Department of Transport) is a classification for accepted standards of quality of brake fluid.


Garden

What is the mix rate of my Two Stroke device?

To ensure the correct mix of oil to petrol in your Two Stroke engine refer to your owner’s handbook. The correct ratio is paramount to ensuring longevity of your Two Stroke engine. Two Stroke engines are more prone to wear compared to four-stroke engines due to the lack of a dedicated lubrication system which means that the parts of a two-stroke engine wear a lot faster. So using the right oil and more importantly the correct ratio of oil to petrol is very important. To view a comprehensive mix ratio chart Click here


Miscellaneous

Is Penrite Australian made?

Penrite Oil Company is the oldest Australian family owned independent oil company in Australia. We boast two blending facilities in Australia. Our first blending facility, along with our Head Office is located in Wantirna, Victoria and our second blending facility is located in Crestmead, Queensland. These two state of the art modern production facilities blend the majority of our product range.
In 2007 Penrite acquired its third blending facility in Bream, England bringing a truly international presence to the Penrite brand.
Penrite’s ongoing philosophy of producing the highest quality product for every application, since 1926, remains a core value of the company to this day.


What is the W viscosity?

The “W” literally stands for Winter grade. In order for an oil to be classified a W grade, it must not exceed specific cold crank viscosity and pumpability tests at specific temperatures (e.g. to be classified as a 0W oil, must not exceed 6200cP at -35°C. Viscosity basically means the thickness of a liquid and how easily it flows. For example, water has a low viscosity compared with, say olive oil. A good quality lubricant maintains its viscosity under different temperature and usage conditions for a longer period of time. Choosing the right viscosity motor oil depends on the conditions your vehicle operates in, but a general rule is that the viscosity should be low enough to ensure that oil can flow to where it's needed, but heavy enough to lubricate and protect parts from heat and wear.


Does Penrite use recycled oil?

The short answer is No, Penrite does not use any recycled oil in the manufacturing process. Rest assured that Penrite only uses newly refined base oils for all of its engine oils.


What is the difference between Light & Heavy Duty vehicles?

Light Duty vehicles are those that are typically less than 3.5 gvw (Gross Vehicle Weight), whilst vehicles above 3.5gvw are considered Heavy Duty vehicles.


How to safely recycle engine oil and dispose of responsibly ?

Used oil, or 'sump oil' can be cleaned and re-used again and again. It can come back to life as industrial burner fuel or hydraulic oil or it can be re-refined back into new lubricating oil.

These days most councils and shires have a local used oil collection facility where you can take smaller quantities of used oil for recycling. Some may also accept oily rags, oil filters and oil containers. If you run a small company, like a workshop or service station, then you may need to contact a used oil collector to come and remove your used oil. Many collectors will do this free of charge.

For more information on recycling your used motor oil safely and responsibly, contact your local council or visit their website.

The Australian Government website also has useful information about recycling used oil: http://www.oilrecycling.gov.au/


Recycling Your Oil

Used oil, or 'sump oil' can be cleaned and re-used again and again. It can come back to life as industrial burner fuel or hydraulic oil or it can be re-refined back into new lubricating oil.

These days most councils and shires have a local used oil collection facility where you can take smaller quantities of used oil for recycling. Some may also accept oily rags, oil filters and oil containers.

If you run a small company, like a workshop or service station, then you may need to contact a used oil collector to come and remove your used oil. Many collectors will do this free of charge.

For more information on recycling your used motor oil safely and responsibly, contact your local council or visit their website.

The Australian Government website also has useful information about recycling used oil: http://www.oilrecycling.gov.au/


Additives

Why should i use an Engine Flush?

An engine flush is an additive added to the engine oil prior to an oil change that chemically cleans the internals of an engine.
Generally these types of products are put in with the old engine oil and the motor is run at idle for 10-15 minutes.
This allows the cleaner in the engine flush to break down engine sludge to allow it to be flushed away with the oil change.
An engine flush can be used at each oil change.


Can I use Diesel Injector Cleaner in a Petrol vehicle?

The short answer is No, the two Injector Cleaners are quite different in their formulation and should not be used in vehicles that run on fuel other than that specified for that particular Injector Cleaner product. Using the wrong product won’t provide any benefits and may actually be detrimental


Can I use Petrol Injector Cleaner in a Diesel vehicle?

The short answer is No, the two Injector Cleaners are quite different in their formulation and should not be used in vehicles that run on fuel other than that specified for that particular Injector Cleaner product. Using the wrong product won’t provide any benefits and may actually be detrimental


What is DPF Cleaner?

DPF Cleaner is a bi-metallic formulation made specifically for vehicles fitted with a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF). when added to the diesel fuel, it lowers soot oxidation temperature allowing regeneration of the DPF at lower temperatures. This prevents blockages and expensive repair or replacement costs.


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